Aug 27, 2014, 11:29

Location: East Aurora, New York, U.S.A.

Member since: July 11, 2012

Tracks in portfolio on MusicRevolution.com: 140 (click here to hear all tracks) http://www.musicrevolution.com/search?artist=5993

–Background

Ed Bentley of Ed Bentley Music is a member of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. Ed’s music includes guitar featured instrumental tracks of the rockabilly, bluegrass, country  and country rock genres.

 

 

 

–High profile projects or clients you have worked for?

I’m just starting to make some headway. Have recently had placements on the History Channel’s “American Pickers”, Animal Planet Network, Discovery Channel, and a few others.

–Primary instrument?

Guitar, also play bass and a little keyboard. I finally was able to get a decent midi controller that works on my guitar, called Triple Play, made by Fishman. Does a nice job.

–Favorite music-making piece of gear or software you currently use?

IK Multimedia’s Philharmonik, and Sampletank. I use Band in a Box now and then, a little program from Canada. Some great “real” musicians playing great styles…

Also use Toontracks, Easy Drummer 2.

–Music education background?

Just a country boy guitar picker. 

In late 2004, I was inducted into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame outside on Nashville.

(http://www.rockabillyhall.com/EdBentley.html )

Having been away from the music scene for a few years, my induction was the needed spark. I jumped back into music with both feet. I started making frequent trips to Nashville, renewing old acquaintances, co-writing with some great writers, and set up a home studio here in Buffalo. Shortly after, I got interested in writing Instrumentals for Film and TV.

–Memorable “Aha!” moment during your musical education?

The day pro tools started to make sense to me! My good friend Aaron Saloman, up in Montreal, might beg to differ, and still thinks there’s room for improvement. Aaron does a lot of my mixing and mastering and generally saves me at times.  Aaron is a Berklee grad and does a great job on edits also (30 sec, 60 sec, etc.).  http://www.musicrevolution.com/musician_profile?username=aaronmusic

–Most embarrassing music-related moment?

When I got to Nashville and tried pitching some of my first songs. What an eye opener, found out just how much I didn’t know about song writing!

–If you had a time machine and could record or perform once with any artist, who would it be?

James Brown or maybe Vince Gill.

–Moment you first knew you would be a musician?

I’ll never forget that morning in July 1956, the first time I heard Johnny Cash on my dad’s barn radio.

 –Advice you would give to a younger family member interested in a music career?

My grandson Jack is showing interest in learning guitar, though he quit his lessons. Although now he’s back at it, trying to learn on his own. I am watching and trying to encourage him, even suggested “he at least learn some chords”. He wanted to be a rock n roll lead player the first week. Got a call from him the other day,

“grampa, I know Am, G, F, C & D.”

Good start Jack!  

–Five songs or albums you’d take with you to a desert island?

Hard one. Being an ole timer, there are so many over the years and the music keeps getting better. I would have to say, Johnny Cash, “I Walk the Line”, changed things for me in 1956.

Over the years, not in any order, Vince Gill, “Look at Us”, Rosanne Cash, “Seven Year Ache”, Lynard Skynard, “Sweet Home Alabama”, and Dire Straits, “Sultans of Swing”.  There are soooooo many others!

–If you could master another instrument, what would it be?

Keyboard… I believe I have missed many opportunities by not being a good player.

I am constantly trying to improve my guitar chops, hard though, it’s that “teach an old dog new tricks” thing.

 –Favorite time of day to work in your studio?

 Definitely mornings. I am a morning person, and the creative juice flows in the AM!

  –Any studio collaboration you experienced that stands out in your mind?

As a country songwriter, I was amazed at being in a studio in Nashville and watching the greatest musicians in the world put their touch on my songs. I was floored when they created an arrangement on a song they had only heard five minutes before…And two takes?

Unheard of in my little world.  What an eye opener!

–Some of your favorite tracks that you would want us to feature in the blog.

Well, “Grass Fire (Hick Hop Remix)” is kind of unique.

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=33111

It’s a bluegrass song with urban drums, comes off pretty well. I wrote it for the current cable TV reality/ swamp show stuff going on right now.

My song “Lonesome Rider” has been used on the Animal Planet Network a couple of times. It was my first attempt at writing and recording for TV.  And my first attempt on pro tools. Whew, glad that’s in the past! Ha

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=33158

Well, just starting to get a foothold in this side of the Industry, I would have to say the following tracks have been selling well–

“Swamp Down” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=33088

“Up A Hill” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=42356

“Rocket Boogie” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=26100

 

We thank Ed Bentley for sharing some of his musical background with us and for contributing his tracks to MusicRevolution.com, the Royalty-Free Music Marketplace. The next time you need lively music instrumental guitar music inspired by rockabilly, bluegrass, country and country rock, check out Ed Bentley Music on MusicRevolution.com.

________________________________________________________________________

Chris Cardell is the co-founder of MusicRevolution.com http://www.musicrevolution.com, a royalty-free music marketplace with over 30,000 tracks online where media producers, video producers, filmmakers, game developers, advertisers, businesses and other music buyers can license high-quality, affordable royalty-free music from an online community of professional musicians. MusicRevolution.com also provides custom music production and custom music streams. The entire MusicRevolution.com production music library is available for third-party distribution and bulk licensing for background music for retail, restaurants and businesses, and for other commercial applications. Cardell has been involved with digital content and E-Commerce since the mid-1990′s.

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Aug 23, 2014, 13:38

The right music in advertising can help you connect with your listeners and viewers to create an entertaining and memorable experience which can help to build your brand. And music can help you further target your advertising audience based on age and musical interests. We wanted to highlight some of the royalty-free advertising music on MusicRevolution.com (www.musicrevolution.com) that could be used for a range of purposes including TV and radio commercials, online video ads, corporate videos, web videos, trade show videos and a range of other applications. We have a wide and diverse selection of royalty-free advertising music.

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “advertising” yields nearly 23,000 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=advertising&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=0&y=0

MusicRevolution.com also has a number of CDs, available in both physical CD and download CD formats, with hand-selected royalty-free music tracks.  We have compiled an outstanding collection of royalty-free advertising music on “Advertising, Vol. 1” –

http://www.musicrevolution.com/cd_details/advertising_vol_1/
The royalty-free music on this CD complements but doesn’t steal the show from your VO talent. These tracks, drawing upon every genre from chill out techno to rock and roll, can tell a story by themselves.

 

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “broadcast” yields over 19,000 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=broadcast&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=43&y=6

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “commercial” yields over 2,000 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=commercial&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=30&y=7

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “branding” yields the following 46 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=branding&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=26&y=6

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “promotion” yields the following 149 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=promotion&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=44&y=8

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “TV ad” yields the following 22 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=tv+ad&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=46&y=6

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “radio ad” yields the following 23 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=radio+ad&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=37&y=6

A memorable ad slogan combined with a catchy jingle tune can create a form of sound branding or sonic branding. A search on MusicRevolution.com for “jingles” yields the following 20 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=jingles&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=0&y=0

With over 30,000 tracks of royalty-free music online in our production music library, MusicRevolution.com (www.musicrevolution.com) has some of the best royalty-free music available anywhere.

_________________________________________

Chris Cardell is the co-founder of MusicRevolution.com http://www.musicrevolution.com, a royalty-free music marketplace with over 30,000 tracks online where media producers, video producers, filmmakers, game developers, advertisers, businesses and other music buyers can license high-quality, affordable royalty-free music from an online community of professional musicians. MusicRevolution.com also provides custom music production and custom music streams. The entire MusicRevolution.com production music library is available for third-party distribution and bulk licensing for background music for retail, restaurants and businesses, and for other commercial applications. Cardell has been involved with digital content and E-Commerce since the mid-1990′s.

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Aug 18, 2014, 12:49

MusicRevolution.com has over 30,000 tracks of high-quality, royalty-free music online. MusicRevolution.com also offers a variety of royalty-free music subscriptions that are a great value. For limited time, buy a 1-Year Complete Subscription (regularly $699.99 for up to 50 downloads) for only $599.99 and Save $100. That’s less than $12 for any track in our production music library. Tracks can be downloaded in either WAV or MP3 format.

Check out our subscriptions today at http://www.musicrevolution.com/subs_options.  This special offer to Save $100 expires August 31, 2014.

With a variety of royalty-free music subscriptions and over 30,000 tracks online, MusicRevolution.com (www.musicrevolution.com) has some of the best royalty-free music available anywhere.

______________________________________________________________________________

Chris Cardell is the co-founder of MusicRevolution.com http://www.musicrevolution.com, a royalty-free music marketplace with over 30,000 tracks online where media producers, video producers, filmmakers, game developers, advertisers, businesses and other music buyers can license high-quality, affordable royalty-free music from an online community of professional musicians. MusicRevolution.com also provides custom music production and custom music streams. The entire MusicRevolution.com production music library is available for third-party distribution and bulk licensing for background music for retail, restaurants and businesses, and for other commercial applications. Cardell has been involved with digital content and E-Commerce since the mid-1990′s.

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Aug 14, 2014, 13:06

As a performing piano player and studio musician, I often have the situation of dealing with either a poorly-tuned, ill-regulated piano, or a digital piano. Even with a fine instrument, the sound or monitors are often a problem leading me to play too hard or to choose not to be heard. And, being a working keyboard player, I don’t have the luxury of having a “Keith Jarrett” moment and walking out. (or worse)

After much thought, I realized that there were several issues with digital pianos leading to less-than-natural sound and feel.

  • Changes in volume and tone are not proportional to energy input at the keyboard, forcing constant “tweaking” of the volume control.
  • Ultra-bright samples are often used in order to “cut through” the mix, even though it is rare (and un-musical) to play that hard consistently.
  • Due to these hard samples, decays are too short, making a “singing” tone impossible.
  • Sympathetic resonance is missing, creating a “sterile” tone.

Measurements

To solve these problems, I took many measurements of my own piano using equipment I built myself and lots of head-scratching. Using a handmade key-playing device, (code-named Ted Stryker) I was able to perform tests of the following characteristics:

  1. Key travel time: This is the time it takes the key to move from top to bottom, at a variety of dynamics. This ranged from approximately 8 ms for the hardest strike possible, to 100ms or more for the softest.
  2. Key top and bottom to sound: This is how long it takes the piano to produce a sound after the key is pressed. I measured this both from when the key starts to move, and from when it hits the bottom.
  3. Touch weight: This was the amount of force needed to achieve a particular dynamic.
  4. Relative decibels: The actual volume of a note measured in decibels, both absolute, and relative to the loudest strike.

Here is one of many tables of measurements:

The Results

After much testing and analysis, I arrived at several conclusions about piano sampling and touch:

  1. The dynamic range of a piano (at least mine) is approximately 33db. This is from the loudest (and it is LOUD) to the softest strike. I tested my physical ability to strike a key as hard as possible, and calibrated my machine to replicate this level. I also designed the machine to play notes at volumes as quiet as possible. (settings below this minimum were too low to get the hammer to the string)
  2. Key travel difference between quiet and hard sounds is much greater on a piano than it is on a typical MIDI controller; in other words, you don’t have to play as hard to get FFF or as soft to get PPP.
  3. Some digital pianos introduce a delay on soft strikes to simulate slower hammer travel. (I used to believe this was the physics of it) It turns out that while the delay from key top to sound varies with dynamics, the key-bottom-to-sound delay is nearly always the same, about 8msregardless of dynamics (!) Since digital pianos trigger towards the bottom of the key (it’s better this way) they don’t need this delay.  Upon reflection, this makes sense, since the key is coupled to the hammer, and only “releases” it at the top letoff point, just below the string.

The Sampling Process

Once these measurements were complete, I used the following process to record the samples:

  • The key-playing calibrated device was used to play every sampled note. This removed any “human” variation in dynamics, and controlled the energy input to the keys precisely and consistently.
  • The samples were recorded at 2-decibel intervals using consistent force for every dynamic across the keyboard. This yielded 16 samples per key.
  • Pedal-down and pedal-up sympathetic resonance were recorded using the same machine.
  • All samples were left at their original volumes, not “normalized.” This could have lead to “jumps” in volume between velocities, but a velocity programming strategy was used to smooth these. (remember, they are only 2db apart)
  • Releases, hammer noise and damper noise were sampled for all 88 keys, and kept at natural as-recorded volumes.
  • Various mic positions were tested to find the “at the keyboard” level of intimacy. These were the same mic positions used in the measurements.
  • Each key was fully sampled in a single session, after careful (obsessive) fine-tuning. This way all the velocities would be perfectly consistent. If they had been sampled at different times, there could have been pitch drift.
  • Every sample was hand-trimmed to absolutely avoid any truncation of the attack, and full decays of every note were recorded, up to 45 seconds. (This required holding my breath to avoid making noise!)

Programming

After the samples were recorded, I used the same device to test the characteristics of various MIDI controllers, and calibrated the samples to play at the same key-drop times measured on the digital keyboard. While all these keyboards are different, there is a pretty common level of correlation between travel-time and MIDI velocity across better brands of weighted keys. The keyboard used as the calibration standard was a Roland RD-700, which is pretty typical of digital actions. In a perfect world, everyone could calibrate the samples to match the ballistics of their personal keyboard, but this is pretty close.

The Result

It took more than a year from conception to final product, including engineering several versions of Ted Stryker, measurements, experiments, editing and programming, and then testing on stage and in the studio. I feel the result is worth it for me, since playing live and recording is more natural, musical and expressive.

Click here to hear demos and download a trial version.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Randy Hoexter is a keyboard instructor & director of education at the Atlanta Institute of Music

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Aug 9, 2014, 12:17

Hip Hop and Rap music are a great way to stay trendy and relevant with your audience, in particular with younger listeners. We wanted to highlight some of the hip hop and rap royalty-free music on MusicRevolution.com (www.musicrevolution.com) that could be used for a range of purposes including TV and radio ads, corporate videos, web videos, background music, on hold music and a range of other applications. We have a great selection of royalty-free hip hop and rap music.

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “hip hop” yields over 1,500 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=hip+hop&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=37&y=5

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “rap” yields over 1.200 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=rap&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=26&y=6

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “RnB” yields over 1,200 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=RnB&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=26&y=3

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “breakbeat” yields nearly 100 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=breakbeat&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=41&y=9

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “gangsta” yields the following 55 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=gangsta&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=29&y=5

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “trip hop” yields the following 51 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=trip+hop&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=44&y=3

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “crunk” yields the following 16 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=crunk&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=39&y=3

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “hick hop” yields the following 11 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=hick+hop&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=23&y=2

MusicRevolution.com also has a number of CDs, available in both physical CD and download CD formats, with hand-selected royalty-free music tracks.  We have compiled a vibrant collection of royalty-free hip hop music on “Hip Hop, Vol. 1” –

http://www.musicrevolution.com/cd_details/hip_hop_vol_1/

Random female vocals, chest-pounding bass tones and politically charged drum beats are sounds that thrive right here in our home town of Atlanta. This is a world-class CD of royalty-free Hip Hop music.

With over 30,000 tracks of royalty-free music online in our production music library, MusicRevolution.com (www.musicrevolution.com) has some of the best royalty-free music available anywhere.

_________________________________________

Chris Cardell is the co-founder of MusicRevolution.com http://www.musicrevolution.com, a royalty-free music marketplace with over 30,000 tracks online where media producers, video producers, filmmakers, game developers, advertisers, businesses and other music buyers can license high-quality, affordable royalty-free music from an online community of professional musicians. MusicRevolution.com also provides custom music production and custom music streams. The entire MusicRevolution.com production music library is available for third-party distribution and bulk licensing for background music for retail, restaurants and businesses, and for other commercial applications. Cardell has been involved with digital content and E-Commerce since the mid-1990′s.

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Aug 4, 2014, 13:33

Location: Weehawken, NJ, United States Of America
Member since: December 26, 2010
Tracks in portfolio on MusicRevolution.com: 144 (click here to hear all tracks)

Joi Veer

It is the song that drives this artist. Never bound by “formula,” Joi’s style has exploded through his gravitation to the guitar as his main songwriting tool. His drumming background has given him a keen awareness of rhythm and percussion which bubbles beneath his signature vocals delivering waves of fluid melody. A splash of “world beat” flavor complements the ever-present electric and acoustic guitars.

 

 

–Background–

1) High profile projects or clients you have worked for?

For the 2006 Winter Olympics, Torino, I was very fortunate to get 28 music cues, many of them 3-5 minutes in length, which spanned across my first 2 collections of music.  Felt really good.  Also, 7 of my tracks were placed on the Late Show with David Letterman, and it was especially fun to hear how they had been used.  My new CD “Present Day” is becoming a bit high profile and is getting some great reviews and attention which, being a composer/recording artist of music for TV who is mainly behind-the-scenes, is quite pleasing.  I put a tremendous amount of work into this collection.

2)      Primary instrument?

Though I began as a drummer and still play drums on my recordings, nowadays, I’d say my main instrument is guitar.  However, I don’t consider myself a “chopster.” 

3)      Favorite music-making piece of gear or software you currently use?

Again, guitar, because when I’m not writing in my head while I’m out and about, I’m writing on guitar.  I approach playing it as a songwriting tool with a “play for the song” mindset to find the right parts when I’m arranging and recording a track, and not as a wild soloing kind of thing.  Frenetic playing is not my sensibility.

4)      Piece of gear or software you wish you owned?

I’d love to have one of the smaller bodied acoustic guitars like the Taylor Grand Concert models.  I also wouldn’t mind having a cool vintage Fender Stratocaster.

5) Film score or song you admire? Why?

There are a lot of film scores that I love, and infinitely more songs, but a few that come to mind are Elliot Goldenthal’s score for the movie “Heat” because it was so effective and moving, yet very minimalistic.  Also, James Horner’s score for “A Beautiful Mind” because so much of it was unbelievably tasteful versions of the main theme song, and he managed to get a lot of mileage out of that.  And lastly, I’ve always loved Bernard Herrmann’s wonderful scores for all those great Alfred Hitchcock suspense movies.  These films probably wouldn’t have had half the success they had without these remarkable scores.

6) Music education background?

Mostly self taught in many ways as far as drums and guitar go.  Early on, I studied a bit of Jazz drumming for a short time, but then continued with Rock and Pop which was what I was really interested in.  I had taken guitar lessons with 2 different teachers, mostly for technique and to break some of the bad habits that were holding me back.  Vocally, I studied privately for 4 ½ years with a wonderful teacher, thank you tons Jane Odin, who really took me from non-singer to singer, not to mention the conceptual training and advice on surviving the music business she taught me.

7) Memorable “Aha!” moment during your musical education?

That’s actually a pretty easy question to answer.  Back when I was studying vocal training, eventually my singing range had started to increase considerably, and I was “getting it right.”  I had become so obsessed and was practicing so much that I started to “not get it right.”  Jane told me that “I had hit the point when the obsessive was not working for me, and to just let it go, not sing for a week or so, and trust that it would all be there when I returned to vocalizing.”  Well, aha!  That worked like a charm and got me over the hump to the next level.  I never forgot that valuable lesson, and it’s applicable in many areas of life as well.

8) If you had a time machine and could record or perform once with any artist, who would it be?

I’d have to really have a work horse of a time machine because there are 3 artists:  Peter Gabriel (during his “So” album phase), Graham Parker (when The Rumour was his backing band), and David Bowie (mostly in the 70s, but some 80’s too.)  So, where is this time machine, I ask you?!

9) Moment you first knew you would be a musician?

I probably knew it was in my blood when I first started playing drums at age 15.  Kind of a late start, I had thought, but I loved it and seemed to pick it up pretty quickly. 

10) Advice you would give to a younger family member interested in a music career?

Well, that advice would be to my 2 finest collaborative creations, my 9 year old twins, (girl and boy) and it would be to know your goals and what you’re getting in to.  And then most importantly, only thru sacrifice and discipline will any success be achieved.  This is not an easy profession, so the sooner they get over any pipe dreams, the better.

11) Five songs or albums you’d take with you to a desert island?

Definitely the following albums:  Peter Gabriel “So”, Graham Parker “Squeezing Out Sparks”, Jeff Buckley “Grace”, U2 “The Joshua Tree”, and lastly either David Bowie “Young Americans” or Dave Matthews “Some Devil” solo album.

12) If you could master another instrument, what would it be?

I play very basic piano/keys, so it would be cool to become more proficient in that instead of just the chordal things I can currently do.  Wouldn’t mind learning some harmonica as well, but I have yet to write a song that needs it to get me going.14) Favorite time of day to work in your studio?

I’d say typically, late afternoon/early evening up to about 10pm.  I find I’m loosened up from the day and feel relaxed to summon up whatever energy and concentration I need.

13) What are your best, or even favorite tracks? Why?

It’s a bit hard for me to say exactly which tracks are my best to date or favs.  There’s quite a few from my new CD “Present Day” which I honestly think are among my best songs ever, and I feel like the recordings sound even beyond what I had in my head.  Some that stand out for me from this collection and are doing quite well are:

“So Much Further Than Far Away”

“I Go”

“Fade to Black”

“Dear Life”

“Sick”

“The Last Thing I Remember”

Some from my previous collections that have been very successful and still get placed in television quite often are:

“Somewhere In Your Soul” (from the “On” album)

“The Perfect Match” (from the “Pearl Diving” album)

“Cherry Punch” (from the “Unsung” album)

“Recharge” (from the “Undertones” album)

As to why my music does well placing in TV, I can only guess that since I don’t try to emulate whatever the latest production trends are, perhaps there’s a timelessness to my songs.  At least, that’s what I’ve been told, but I try not to over-think it too much and just keep writing.

We thank Joi Veer for sharing some of his musical background with us and for contributing his tracks to MusicRevolution.com, the Royalty-Free Music Marketplace. The next time you need music songs that are conceptually, lyrically and musically engaging in their dynamics, check out Joi Veer’s music on MusicRevolution.com.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Mike Bielenberg is a professional musician and co-founder of http://www.musicrevolution.com, a production music marketplace with over 30,000 tracks online where media producers, video producers, filmmakers, game developers, businesses and other music buyers can license high-quality, affordable royalty-free music from an online community of musicians mbielenberg@musicrevolution.com.

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Jul 30, 2014, 14:05

There’s a tourist attraction in my hometown of Atlanta – started by some friends years ago – called Metalsome Monday. It’s Karaoke – but with a genius twist: Heavy metal songs backed by a killer live band. It draws throngs of 80′s refugees, hipsters, club-goers and other types who normally wouldn’t be caught dead in a Karaoke bar. It’s featured in all the tourist guides. It’s listed in all the hotel brochures.

Sometimes it’s the smallest twist on an old thing that finally brings in that wider audience we’ve been hoping for.

Paul O’ Connor; a media producer, blogger & catalyst-for-social-change based in the UK; is doing the same thing for the medium of short film.

Put simply, his twist on short films is the physical environment in which they’re presented. Sol Cinema is a mobile movie theater powered entirely by the sun. It’s a caravan (or trailer as we say in the states) that comfortably accommodates eight adults.

It’s become a hugely popular attraction at large outdoor festivals where attendees strolling around can pop in to see a short, independent, presumably mind-blowing film. All while enjoying the complete movie-theater experience – replete with usherettes, popcorn and the red carpet.

“I’d been showing films at festivals for a long time” Paul explains. “But they were all at night. I wondered ‘How do you get people watch films during the day?’ It’s really, really hard to black things off and make that happen.”

“So we came up with the idea to do it in an enlcosed space that was mobile. Make it so audiences get the popcorn, have the movie experience, etc. The idea is that with that kind of introduction, they feel connected to the film. I’ve always found the idea of ‘mini-plexes’ more interesting than ‘multi-plexes’.”

 

Paul and his colleagues first introduced the concept at a festival at a St. Patrick’s Day festival in Dublin. “I’ve found that audiences in Ireland are a bit more open to experimentation with this kind of thing. So it seemed like the best place to try the idea. We put up the website (www.thesolcinema.org) and said ‘Let’s try what it is.’”

“The film we showed was by an animator who obtained audio transcripts of these famous interviews conducted in the 1950′s. The animations were just brilliant. I can’t remember the name of the film right now (O ‘Connor had just returned from a festival and was exhausted), but it was absolutely amazing. We believe that kind of work deserves more exposure.”

Today Sol Cinema has been a hit at over 20 festivals in the UK.

“We just returned from Glastonberry where there were over 200K attendees – just a huge event. It’s been great to see so many people get introduced to these films and have a good time doing it.”

When Sol Cinema debuted, O’ Connor relied on content contributed by filmmakers he knew through personal connections. But as I heard him describe the size and scope of this new audience he and his colleagues have now tapped, I thought to myself “This guy’s going to have indie film studios knocking on his door in no time.”

Congratulations to you, Paul, on creating something we think is more scarce than a mind-blowing short film…a channel through which that film can be delivered that has a wide audience.

Well done, mate.

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Mike Bielenberg is a professional musician and co-founder of http://www.musicrevolution.com, a production music marketplace with over 30,000 tracks online where media producers, video producers, filmmakers, game developers, businesses and other music buyers can license high-quality, affordable royalty-free music from an online community of musicians mbielenberg@musicrevolution.com.

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Jul 24, 2014, 16:39

Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Member since: April 28, 2010

Tracks in portfolio on MusicRevolution.com: 741 (click here to hear all tracks) http://www.musicrevolution.com/search?artist=179

–Background

Rick Dickert’s early musical studies resulted in bronze and silver medals from Trinity College of Music (London) for musical theory exams. Rick now offers composition and production music for use in television, film, live applications, web animations, ringtones and video games. Rick Dickert’s tracks draw from an audio palette of vintage keyboards, state-of-the-art virtual instruments, real percussion and real guitars and bass. Rick’s music is inspired by classic rock, traditional jazz and classical composers, particularly of baroque chamber music.

–High profile projects or clients you have worked for?

I rarely know who downloads my tracks or how they’re used, but the companies Elizabeth Arden and Ernst & Young have appeared on my track usage reports.

–Primary instrument?

Over the years the piano’s been my main instrument, but as I edit more on the computer I spend less time playing keyboards and more time on guitars.

–Favorite music-making piece of gear or software you currently use?

I’ve used Cubase since the mid-90s and I just upgraded to 7.5 with an MR816csx interface. I love this system and I’m looking forward to learning how to use it to its full potential.

–Piece of gear or software you wish you owned?

I’d love to own more guitars; if I could choose one I’d probably pick something like an Ovation acoustic.

–Film score or song you admire? Why?

I remember first paying attention to film music when I heard the shark theme in the movie “Jaws.” I loved how those few notes made the scenes scarier. Lately I really admire John Williams’ score from “Memoirs of a Geisha”, because of the beautiful compositions featuring Yo-yo Ma and Itzhak Perlman as featured soloists.

–Music education background?

I had a couple of piano teachers and a few vocal lessons from a couple of instructors. I wasn’t a good piano student at the time because I had little interest in the classical music assigned for my studies. I did spend a significant time at the piano playing pop music and won bronze and silver medals for theory exams from Trinity College of Music (London).

Later on the road I continued to learn from some excellent musicians. I also started arranging while working as a single performer. I used keyboards, playing bass with my left hand as well as rhythm and lead lines with my right to a drum machine programmed specifically for each song.

–Memorable “Aha!” moment during your musical education?

Possibly when I realized that the classical rules of harmony weren’t being followed by my favorite rock musicians at the time. For example, I think we may be able to find parallel fifths or some other violation on the Deep Purple album “Machine Head”.

–Most embarrassing music-related moment?

One night while playing the single act with a drum machine, keyboards and vocals, I somehow sang a note that had no useful relation to the chords I was playing, as if my hands and voice weren’t on the same page. It was scary and hard to describe, but I think it happened because my agent was there.

–If you had a time machine and could record or perform once with any artist, who would it be?

I think I’d like to play with Fats Waller, even a small part in his band. I saw the musical “Ain’t Misbehavin’” and read his biography. I would have loved to hear those jazz pianists outdoing each other at the rent parties.

 –Moment you first knew you would be a musician?

At a concert during summer vacation in high school, the question of whether I’d continue playing hockey popped into my mind. Seeing The Guess Who rocking out settled it for me; I would quit hockey to spend more time rehearsing music. Obviously joining the American Federation of Musicians was also very significant.

 –Advice you would give to a younger family member interested in a music career?

Be open to all kinds of music, learn about business. Plan for another source of income, without letting it become your reason to stop working at music. Ultimately I believe those destined to succeed can’t be permanently discouraged. (Cue the Hedley song “Anything”)

–Five songs or albums you’d take with you to a desert island?

Amanda Marshall’s self-titled first album

The Guess Who’s “#10”

Paula Cole’s “This Fire”

Steely Dan’s “Aja“

Elton John’s “The Fox”

–If you could master another instrument, what would it be?

The cello

–Favorite time of day to work in your studio?

I think I tend to get the most done in the mornings, which I prefer.

–Any studio collaboration you experienced that stands out in your mind?

I played with Hourglass, a Guelph, Ontario based band. We recorded some covers for a club album and lip-synced some tracks for a TV show, which I believe helped me become a full ACTRA member.

–Some of your favorite tracks that you would want us to feature in the blog.

My favorite tracks include—

“Winter Holiday Piano” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=5181

“Royal York Main Theme Remix” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=5139

“Latin Guitar Combo” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=24162

I think probably my best selling track is a dark piano piece called “Atlas Requiem II.” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=5941

By the way, I really appreciate all the communication and help from Music Revolution!

We thank Rick Dickert for sharing some of his musical background with us and for contributing his tracks to MusicRevolution.com, the Royalty-Free Music Marketplace. The next time you need music inspired by classic rock, traditional jazz and classical composers, including baroque chamber music, check out Rick Dickert’s music on MusicRevolution.com.

________________________________________________________________________

Chris Cardell is the co-founder of MusicRevolution.com http://www.musicrevolution.com, a royalty-free music marketplace with over 30,000 tracks online where media producers, video producers, filmmakers, game developers, advertisers, businesses and other music buyers can license high-quality, affordable royalty-free music from an online community of professional musicians. MusicRevolution.com also provides custom music production and custom music streams. The entire MusicRevolution.com production music library is available for third-party distribution and bulk licensing for background music for retail, restaurants and businesses, and for other commercial applications. Cardell has been involved with digital content and E-Commerce since the mid-1990′s.

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Jul 21, 2014, 12:24

New Age music is music of a range of styles intended to convey feelings of relaxation, inspiration and optimism. To us, the New Age movement was taken mainstream by artists like Yanni, Enya, Kitaro,Vangelis and Philip Glass. We wanted to highlight some of the New Age royalty-free music on MusicRevolution.com (www.musicrevolution.com) that could be used for a range of purposes including TV and radio commercials, corporate videos, web videos, trade show videos, company meetings, health spas, yoga, background music, on hold music and other applications.

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “New Age” yields over 3,000 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=new+age&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=0&y=0

MusicRevolution.com also has a number of CDs, available in both physical CD and download CD formats, with hand-selected royalty-free music tracks.  We have assembled a soothing collection of royalty-free New Age music on “New Age, Vol. 1” –

http://www.musicrevolution.com/cd_details/new_age_vol_1/

This CD of royalty-free New Age music is intended to relax your audience while ever so gently tugging on their heartstrings. This is royalty-free music to which you can bathe, meditate, hypnotize and generally decompress.

 

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “spa” yields over 2.300 royalty-free music tracks-

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=spa&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=32&y=8

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “relaxation” yields nearly 150 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=relaxation&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=35&y=3

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “meditation” yields nearly 150 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=meditation&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=40&y=5

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “soothing” yields nearly 300 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=soothing&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=28&y=6

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “spiritual” yields over 100 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=spiritual&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=48&y=3

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “yoga” yields the following 77 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=yoga&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=24&y=6

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “tranquility” yields the following 57 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=tranquility&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=36&y=3

A search on MusicRevolution.com for “massage” yields 70 royalty-free music tracks—

http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?keyword=massage&application=0&mood=0&genre=0&instrument=0&vocals=1&results=20&x=35&y=9

With over 30,000 tracks of royalty-free music online in our production music library, MusicRevolution.com (www.musicrevolution.com) has some of the best royalty-free music available anywhere.

________________________________________

Chris Cardell is the co-founder of MusicRevolution.com http://www.musicrevolution.com, a royalty-free music marketplace with over 30,000 tracks online where media producers, video producers, filmmakers, game developers, advertisers, businesses and other music buyers can license high-quality, affordable royalty-free music from an online community of professional musicians. MusicRevolution.com also provides custom music production and custom music streams. The entire MusicRevolution.com production music library is available for third-party distribution and bulk licensing for background music for retail, restaurants and businesses, and for other commercial applications. Cardell has been involved with digital content and E-Commerce since the mid-1990′s.

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Jul 17, 2014, 11:33

Location: Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A

Member since: June 24, 2010

Tracks in portfolio on MusicRevolution.com: 462 (click here to hear all tracks) http://www.musicrevolution.com/search?artist=285

 –Background

Richard Ames is a composer, arranger, and producer who has premiered compositions and arrangements with performing ensembles across the United States. His music also has appeared as underscore for feature films and commercials, TV shows, trailers, and animations on every major broadcast and cable network. His music is a careful balance of modern techniques and classically inspired structures, creating music that is both accessible and sophisticated.

–Projects or clients you have worked for?

I’ve had a pretty broad range of clients and projects – everything from film to TV to advertising to corporate.  I’ve even had the opportunity to do a few concert pieces.  Most recently, I’ve had really good placements in the film “One Chance” by director David Frankel (Devil Wears Prada) and advertisements for Target and Klondike.  I’m always amazed at the uses that people find for my music.

–Primary instrument?

Clarinet – I come from the classical music world and spent most of my musical career as a performer on concert stages, pit orchestras, studios, weddings, just about anything that paid a few bucks!  I’ve slowly transitioned to writing music over the last 6-7 years, mostly for film/TV but with a few concert works here and there.

–Favorite music-making piece of gear or software you currently use?

People think I’m joking but it’s true: my trash can (literally and figuratively).  I feel that writing music is partly a process of elimination, so every time I eliminate something, I’m further along in the process.

–Piece of gear or software you wish you owned?

I don’t think it exists – a 3″ high 88-key controller so I can comfortably use both my computer keyboard and MIDI keyboard without having to strain to use one or the other or bash my knees against something.

–Film score or song you admire? Why?

There are so many- I’m a huge fan of John Williams, Danny Elfman, John Powell, Hans Zimmer, and James Newton Howard.  Because I come from the classical music world, I love the orchestral sound, especially when it’s combined with synthesizers and other elements from modern pop music.

–Music education background?

My musical training is in clarinet performance, most notably with Loren Kitt (National Symphony Orchestra) and David Niethamer (Richmond Symphony).

–Memorable “Aha!” moment during your musical education?

There have been many but here’s an example: I was performing in a chamber music concert and we nailed a technical section that we never got right in rehearsal.  That was when I really understood how the combination of musicians and an audience can create something that doesn’t exist anywhere else.

–Most embarrassing music-related moment?

Forgetting to bring music to an audition – it’s awkward to borrow music from someone you’re competing against.  Plus, reading music you know but with someone else’s notes will rattle your brain a bit – that’s the last thing you want to do in an audition.  Needless to say, I didn’t get that gig!

–If you had a time machine and could record or perform once with any artist, who would it be?

My grandfather and his brothers – the Ames Brothers.  They were a hugely popular vocal quartet in the 50′s and 60′s and even got a Grammy nomination.  I would have loved to tour with them and their bands.

–Moment you first knew you would be a musician?

I think I eased in to it but probably sometime around my freshman year in High School I realized that I would always be a musician.  Music was always a part of my life before then, either as a performer or as a kid listening to records, but I never considered how it would affect my entire life until I was in my mid-teens.

–Advice you would give to a younger family member interested in a music career?

If you have to think about it, don’t do it.

–Five songs or albums you’d take with you to a desert island?

“By Request: Best of John Williams and the Boston Pops”

“The Goat Rodeo Sessions” feat. Yo-Yo Ma

“Mahler Symphony No 5″ Benjamin Zander and the Philharmonia Orchestra

“How to Train Your Dragon” soundtrack by John Powell

“Batman” soundtrack by Danny Elfman

–If you could master another instrument, what would it be?

Definitely piano – particularly with modern music production tools, it really helps to have piano chops.

–Favorite time of day to work in your studio?

First thing in the morning – I’m less creative after lunch so I try to write first thing in the morning and leave more mundane tasks until the afternoon.

–Any studio collaboration you experienced that stands out in your mind?

Most of my studio collaboration has been as a performer – I have done recordings of several clarinet pieces in my studio for projects in a variety of other locations.

–Some of your favorite tracks that you would want us to feature in the blog.

“Waiting to Strike” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=44348

“Surely You Are Joking” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=44361

“Through the Looking Glass” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=42931

“Quirky Comedy 4 – Epic Comedy” http://www.musicrevolution.com/search/?trackid=22171

“Quirky Comedy 4 – Epic Comedy” – it’s a short, quirky track I wrote for a closing credits roll and it gets used all the time.  “Through the Looking Glass” is another one that gets a lot of use – it has a bit of that Philip Glass minimalism feel that has become popular in advertising.

 

We thank Richard Ames for sharing some of his musical background with us and for contributing his tracks to MusicRevolution.com, the Royalty-Free Music Marketplace. The next time you need modern, sophisticated, classically inspired music for feature films, commercials, TV shows, trailers, and animations, check out Richard Ames Music on MusicRevolution.com.

________________________________________________________________________

Chris Cardell is the co-founder of MusicRevolution.com http://www.musicrevolution.com, a royalty-free music marketplace with over 30,000 tracks online where media producers, video producers, filmmakers, game developers, advertisers, businesses and other music buyers can license high-quality, affordable royalty-free music from an online community of professional musicians. MusicRevolution.com also provides custom music production and custom music streams. The entire MusicRevolution.com production music library is available for third-party distribution and bulk licensing for background music for retail, restaurants and businesses, and for other commercial applications. Cardell has been involved with digital content and E-Commerce since the mid-1990′s.

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